(photo from Mashable’s article "These Websites Are Going Dark to Protest SOPA Wednesday")

You better answer any burning questions you might normally look to Wikipedia.org for TONIGHT. The highly used online encyclopedia is turning out its lights tomorrow to show you what the internet might look like if the Stop Online Piracy Act passes. And they aren’t the only ones. 7,000 sites say they will participate in the biggest online black out in U.S. history tomorrow. So don’t plan on updating your Word Press blog or wasting time at work scouring Reddit tomorrow.

While behemoth Google will stay up, they will  provide links on their search page explaining how the act will infringe on freedom of expression. And that’s a big deal. This will be the first time Google will participate in a current political movement

Government officials who support SOPA have lashed out against the protest. Senator Chris Dodd (Chairman and CEO of the Motion Picture Association of America) has called tech businesses actions “irresponsible,” saying they are “resorting to stunts that punish users or turn them into their corporate pawns.”  And some sites, like Twitter, have said they are opting out of the blackout because it is bad for business. 

What the convoluted SOPA will mean for the average Internet user is kind of confusing even to those who have been following this controversy since it began. If you’re still confused about what the argument against SOPA is, Chris Heald has an article up today on Mashable breaking it down

Tweets in Review

To the at least 100 of you reading out there (a special THANK YOU to all of you, it’s so exciting to be able to say that), we know you just can’t get enough of what’s on the BRINK.  While I’m sure most you think this is as good as it gets, there’s more.  Our tweets were filled with interesting content that we didn’t even blog about.  As always, below is just a little taste so you don’t feel completely left out:

August 15

August 16

  • Reach ‘em online: Affluent Americans access the Internet more often & have greater product recall from web ads: http://ht.ly/63I20
  • Who are the 6.2% of mobile users who are QR scanning? Study shows they Skew Male, Young, Wealthy: http://ht.ly/63IUb
  • Did You Know? 85% of online Americans view digital ads, and 60% take action! Impressive numbers: http://ht.ly/64KX9

August 17

  • Tracking your brand’s social buzz? Be sure to identify alternative brand names/spelling. Great tips here: http://ht.ly/63KbB
  • The “Post-PC World” is coming. New study predicts next year will bring the transformation with mobiles replacing laptops:http://ht.ly/65Jz8
  • Wikipedia - Not for Women? Learn how gender imbalance plays out at the leading online encyclopedia: http://ht.ly/64Mbr ^MG

August 18

  • This infographic is scarily accurate when it comes to Brink HQ http://t.co/scyiIO1
  • Yikes: Two men in Britain sentenced to four years each for inciting riots via social media. Where do you stand? http://ht.ly/66PNY ^MG

Follow us.  Like us.  Love us.  See ya next week.

According to ReadWriteWeb, the social site that is least pleasing to consumers is Facebook, while Wikipedia had 78% satisfaction (out of 70,000 consumers surveyed).  In what should come as a shock to few, MySpace dropped out of the survey because of scoring so low last year.  I actually find these results shocking, at least for Facebook, considering how many people use it.  If so many are unsatisfied with it, why are there so many users (750 million)?  Obviously you can’t just look at number of users and must also consider frequency of usage/logging in, but still.  I never realized that there was that much dissatisfaction with the social media site.
This leads to the natural question of “what does this mean for Google+?”  With 10 million users flocking to the site in 2 weeks, it’s apparent that many users are looking for a Facebook alternative.  And with these numbers being revealed, it’s clear that just because Facebook has more users, doesn’t mean that it necessarily provides higher consumer satisfaction; the lesson is quantity doesn’t equal quality.
However, some are not so quick to make the change.  As I’ve continually said, I see no glaring problems with Facebook.  It does what I want it to do, and I’m okay with that.  Brian Solis recently wrote an article reviewing Google+ compared to Facebook, and I agree with most things, especially the confusing Circles features (which still has not settled well with me).
Are you dissatisfied with Facebook?  If so, have you made the permanent move to Google+? What do you like and dislike about each?

According to ReadWriteWeb, the social site that is least pleasing to consumers is Facebook, while Wikipedia had 78% satisfaction (out of 70,000 consumers surveyed).  In what should come as a shock to few, MySpace dropped out of the survey because of scoring so low last year.  I actually find these results shocking, at least for Facebook, considering how many people use it.  If so many are unsatisfied with it, why are there so many users (750 million)?  Obviously you can’t just look at number of users and must also consider frequency of usage/logging in, but still.  I never realized that there was that much dissatisfaction with the social media site.

This leads to the natural question of “what does this mean for Google+?”  With 10 million users flocking to the site in 2 weeks, it’s apparent that many users are looking for a Facebook alternative.  And with these numbers being revealed, it’s clear that just because Facebook has more users, doesn’t mean that it necessarily provides higher consumer satisfaction; the lesson is quantity doesn’t equal quality.

However, some are not so quick to make the change.  As I’ve continually said, I see no glaring problems with Facebook.  It does what I want it to do, and I’m okay with that.  Brian Solis recently wrote an article reviewing Google+ compared to Facebook, and I agree with most things, especially the confusing Circles features (which still has not settled well with me).

Are you dissatisfied with Facebook?  If so, have you made the permanent move to Google+? What do you like and dislike about each?