Apparently, Kodak had a better handle on marketing technology to women in the early 1900’s than many brands have today. The company may be going bankrupt now, but according to an article on the Guardian’s site today (where these images appeared) early marketing of their cameras effectively targeted women by showing the ease and quality of Kodak. A better strategy than the "pinkification" of products many companies resort to when targeting woman, which can alienate men AND women. And maybe if the male dominated tech field approached marketing differently, they wouldn’t be still using CES booth babes to sell gadgets (and getting plenty of flack online for doing it). Afterall, Apple has had no problem getting women to buy iPhones, and they didn’t even have to make a pink version to do it.  Apparently, Kodak had a better handle on marketing technology to women in the early 1900’s than many brands have today. The company may be going bankrupt now, but according to an article on the Guardian’s site today (where these images appeared) early marketing of their cameras effectively targeted women by showing the ease and quality of Kodak. A better strategy than the "pinkification" of products many companies resort to when targeting woman, which can alienate men AND women. And maybe if the male dominated tech field approached marketing differently, they wouldn’t be still using CES booth babes to sell gadgets (and getting plenty of flack online for doing it). Afterall, Apple has had no problem getting women to buy iPhones, and they didn’t even have to make a pink version to do it.  Apparently, Kodak had a better handle on marketing technology to women in the early 1900’s than many brands have today. The company may be going bankrupt now, but according to an article on the Guardian’s site today (where these images appeared) early marketing of their cameras effectively targeted women by showing the ease and quality of Kodak. A better strategy than the "pinkification" of products many companies resort to when targeting woman, which can alienate men AND women. And maybe if the male dominated tech field approached marketing differently, they wouldn’t be still using CES booth babes to sell gadgets (and getting plenty of flack online for doing it). Afterall, Apple has had no problem getting women to buy iPhones, and they didn’t even have to make a pink version to do it.  Apparently, Kodak had a better handle on marketing technology to women in the early 1900’s than many brands have today. The company may be going bankrupt now, but according to an article on the Guardian’s site today (where these images appeared) early marketing of their cameras effectively targeted women by showing the ease and quality of Kodak. A better strategy than the "pinkification" of products many companies resort to when targeting woman, which can alienate men AND women. And maybe if the male dominated tech field approached marketing differently, they wouldn’t be still using CES booth babes to sell gadgets (and getting plenty of flack online for doing it). Afterall, Apple has had no problem getting women to buy iPhones, and they didn’t even have to make a pink version to do it. 

Apparently, Kodak had a better handle on marketing technology to women in the early 1900’s than many brands have today. The company may be going bankrupt now, but according to an article on the Guardian’s site today (where these images appeared) early marketing of their cameras effectively targeted women by showing the ease and quality of Kodak. A better strategy than the "pinkification" of products many companies resort to when targeting woman, which can alienate men AND women. And maybe if the male dominated tech field approached marketing differently, they wouldn’t be still using CES booth babes to sell gadgets (and getting plenty of flack online for doing it). Afterall, Apple has had no problem getting women to buy iPhones, and they didn’t even have to make a pink version to do it.