Another big pat on the back to Time magazine for being the clear leader in integrating magazine journalism with the tablet format.  According to Mashable, the publishing giant is looking to not just create tablet-friendly online versions of their publications, but separate apps for each.  While this will surely be difficult and expensive, it’s also a bold step in the right direction.  Check out the article to get a full description of Time’s plan.
We blogged last week about how Time was declared the company with the highest digital IQ, despite the fact that most publishers are still apprehensive about jumping on the tablet train.  But figures have shown that tablets are not going away, and that they are the future for journalism and magazine publication.  Time is realizing that the age of the magazine is slowly dwindling away, and their intuition to go ahead and take this necessary next step should be applauded.

Another big pat on the back to Time magazine for being the clear leader in integrating magazine journalism with the tablet format.  According to Mashable, the publishing giant is looking to not just create tablet-friendly online versions of their publications, but separate apps for each.  While this will surely be difficult and expensive, it’s also a bold step in the right direction.  Check out the article to get a full description of Time’s plan.

We blogged last week about how Time was declared the company with the highest digital IQ, despite the fact that most publishers are still apprehensive about jumping on the tablet train.  But figures have shown that tablets are not going away, and that they are the future for journalism and magazine publication.  Time is realizing that the age of the magazine is slowly dwindling away, and their intuition to go ahead and take this necessary next step should be applauded.

We just blogged earlier today about how newspapers are becoming a thing of the past, as tablets and constantly updated news feeds (specifically, Twitter) take over.  With information spreading so quickly on the web, why would people still subscribe to newspapers?  It seems like such a waste.  Well, AdAge is asking the same thing, and compiled a survey of the results.  Check out the graphic above that we pulled from Business Insider.

AOL is prepared to launch a new iPad app called “Editions” that evolves around personalized news.  According to AdWeek, the app hopes “to be an enhanced version of reading newspapers in the morning.”

While I understand the point of simulating a virtual magazine reading experience, this does seem like a step backwards.  I think it’s pretty clear that the live news feed set up of Twitter is the future for staying informed.  At this point, information spreads so rapidly on the internet that an app that limits content and delivers only once a day would seem to be missing a lot.  

However, I’m a big fan of the personalized settings and the alleged algorithm that determines what content one would find interesting.  It’s kind of like following a trending topic on Twitter, which is sometimes better than just following one account that spews out all kind of news.

We’ll see how it turns out, but like I said, I don’t think this is what is needed to break ahead in the app market.  This could be a nice bridge to encourage consumers to turn to tablets as their main source for news, especially for older users.  But for a younger crowd who is constantly involved in social media such as Twitter and Tumblr, this may be a little too slow, stale, and essentially useless.