SImplicity can be so enticing…
karenhurley:

Fruit-Shaped jam bottle advertising manipulations for La Vieja Fabrica. 
Advertising Agency: tapsa
SImplicity can be so enticing…
karenhurley:

Fruit-Shaped jam bottle advertising manipulations for La Vieja Fabrica. 
Advertising Agency: tapsa

SImplicity can be so enticing…

karenhurley:

Fruit-Shaped jam bottle advertising manipulations for La Vieja Fabrica. 

Advertising Agency: tapsa

Have you read designer Brandon Kowitz’s new article on Medium: Why you should move that button 3px to the left? It’s about managing the gap between functional and delightful, and it’s full of observations and advice relevant to anyone who works in design or development or both — as we do at BRINK.

Kowitz describes how a designer’s perfectionist instincts might conflict with the rush of production or the aesthetic-indifference of some managers and engineers. Then he offers a few ideas to help us bridge the gap:

  1. A brief apologia for the designer’s detail-obsession, aiming to convince project managers that they should lend an ear to whining designers — he reminds us that spot-on designs increase trust and usability and therefore increase the value of the site and the $$$.
  2. A few principles that might help manage the conflicting demands of designers and deadlines:
    • Batch up work into sprints
    • Polish as you go
    • Avoid “customization icebergs”

Have a look at the article for more details!

Here at BRINK we’re always striving to balance perfectionism with speed, obsessive attention to detail with the need to deliver. We share Kowitz’s commitment to quality design and development, to creating intuitive user experiences that inspire trust — and delight.

These are strange times. The global mass culture - propelled by the ever-present Internet -  is constantly at our finger tips. Individuals have easy access to inspiration, and their own work can benefit from that influence. Then, they can spread their ideas to the entire world with one click. 

Social media has revolutionized our ability to exhibit our portfolios to new eyes. Basically, it’s never been easier for us to share and connect. But this new heap of culture and art (we used to have to actual go out into the physical world to find this stuff!) can be difficult to navigate.  Which is why, in the spirit of sharing, I’ve highlighted two new social start-ups that make digging through the muck or getting your work into appreciative hands even easier. 

Stipple - Not designed for artists, but useful to them - Stipple lets you attach dynamic attributes to images, from text to links, and you can even add a shopping cart. Though still in beta, it’s easy to see how it could cure the problem of anonymous internet folk slapping your art on their blog without any credit to their source. Plus, the addition of analytics means you’ll be able to see the progress of your work as it travels through the wild realms of the internet - Tumbling and Pinning its merry way to new viewers’ eyes. It’s easy to see how a creative entrepreneur could do well to use Stipple. 

Iconify - Make a portfolio, and turn it into an app. Great for a creative with a tiny budget. With a focus on sharing, the site puts your work front and center, optimized for viewing on any size screen. There’s just a simple 51 pixel menu with icons encouraging viewers to share and connect. And you’ll never be without your portfolio again. 

Now, there are many more start-ups out there like this. But these two, with their simple, user-friendly design and emphasis on sharing, are definitely worth looking into, whether you’re a creative or scouting for fresh visuals (and the people who can make them). 

- Alexsey Kashtelyan