It’s kind of crazy to think the influential bloggers now seated in the front row of the most coveted brands fashion shows evolved from the lowly role their counterparts played as online diarists. Now, the Gap is ditching the obligatory seasonal catalog in favor of a shareable, constantly changing look book primed for social networks and featuring fashion bloggers. But way back then (the ’90s), things on the Internet looked a whole lot different. Click on the top infographic from Flowtown to see a clear picture of how we got here.  It’s kind of crazy to think the influential bloggers now seated in the front row of the most coveted brands fashion shows evolved from the lowly role their counterparts played as online diarists. Now, the Gap is ditching the obligatory seasonal catalog in favor of a shareable, constantly changing look book primed for social networks and featuring fashion bloggers. But way back then (the ’90s), things on the Internet looked a whole lot different. Click on the top infographic from Flowtown to see a clear picture of how we got here. 

It’s kind of crazy to think the influential bloggers now seated in the front row of the most coveted brands fashion shows evolved from the lowly role their counterparts played as online diarists. Now, the Gap is ditching the obligatory seasonal catalog in favor of a shareable, constantly changing look book primed for social networks and featuring fashion bloggers. But way back then (the ’90s), things on the Internet looked a whole lot different. Click on the top infographic from Flowtown to see a clear picture of how we got here. 

We blog a lot about social media, but for some reason never include this extremely important and interesting platform of Tumblr.  Maybe because we use it so often, we just assume y’all know how much we love it.

But apparently we’re not the only ones who are obsessed.  According to Advertising Age, fashion retailers are catching on because of “its highly visual method of storytelling.”  Brands such as Alexander McQueen and Oscar de la Renta “usually take advantage of Tumblr’s strong visuals by posting looks from their latest collections or catalogs.”  This should come as no surprise to those who use Tumblr regularly, seeing as stunning photography of fashion frequently pop up on my dashboard and always attract my eye when I’m “exploring” Tumblr.  It’s like flipping through an endless catalogue of beautifully shot photographs.  It’s no wonder that fashion retailers are taking advantage of it.  Not to mention, the “Fashion” tag is frequently one of the most followed/contributed to tags on Tumblr.  It’s especially great seeing publications such as Vogue and fashion icons like Lady Gaga take advantage of it.

Blogging has allowed conversations to happen about fashion, in a way that Twitter and Facebook don’t necessarily allow.  With the ability to post photos and comment directly on what you enjoy, designers and fashion retailers have the ability to share their designs and inspirations with an entire community eager to eat it up and comment.

Watch as the graphic on your t-shirt turns into an iPad game.  Hybrid Apparel could be the future of fashion.