While we’ve talked about integrating technology and education before, where should the line be drawn?  According to All Facebook, it should be at teachers being too open on social networking sites.  In fact, a new study has revealed that teachers in the U.K. are terrified of Facebook.
The article goes into great detail explaining how teachers try to live normal lives on Facebook, even going so far as to befriend their students despite posting inappropriate things.  The article specifically cites photos as the main downfall of teachers, claiming that they are too open with their personal lives despite the fact that we “ expect them to behave in a certain way.”
The article continues, hitting the nail on the head with the following statement: “Social media has allowed many of us to be far more open about the ways that we each choose to live our lives. It’s entirely opt-in — that is, you don’t have to get involved — and the privacy controls are in place on networks such as Facebook to let you decide how much of yourself you want to make public. And how much you don’t.”

While we’ve talked about integrating technology and education before, where should the line be drawn?  According to All Facebook, it should be at teachers being too open on social networking sites.  In fact, a new study has revealed that teachers in the U.K. are terrified of Facebook.

The article goes into great detail explaining how teachers try to live normal lives on Facebook, even going so far as to befriend their students despite posting inappropriate things.  The article specifically cites photos as the main downfall of teachers, claiming that they are too open with their personal lives despite the fact that we “ expect them to behave in a certain way.”

The article continues, hitting the nail on the head with the following statement: “Social media has allowed many of us to be far more open about the ways that we each choose to live our lives. It’s entirely opt-in — that is, you don’t have to get involved — and the privacy controls are in place on networks such as Facebook to let you decide how much of yourself you want to make public. And how much you don’t.”

How education and technology interact has been a hot topic here on our blog, and new studies about it just keep flooding it.  Just recently, OnlineEducation.net made the above infographic outlining how students use technology.  Business Insider breaks the infographic down a bit, and takes out some key information, but there’s not really anything shocking to me.  We’ve said before that youth have an addiction to social networking sites, and that an entire generation has become completely reliant on technology.  

What did surprise me, however, was the relationship between Twitter usage and grades.  With the positive correlation between the two, it’s obvious that this should be the direction education moves in.  I wasn’t even aware that there were classrooms using Twitter to engage its students, but I’m thrilled to see it happening. 

Jeez, the stories we’ve been reading today just seem to be perfectly falling into our lap.  We just blogged about the presence of technology in education and asked if it could indeed be distracting.
Well lo and behold, a study of Facebook just published by Mashable begins with this statement: “In the debate over whether social media has a positive or negative effect on education, a new study to be published in Computers & Education has made a refreshing suggestion: Neither. It depends how you use it.”
The article goes on to say that those who post photos, comment on posts, play games, etc. don’t do as well as those who simply RSVP to Facebook events.  The entire post is an interesting read, and brings up some good points.  Check it out at the link above.

Jeez, the stories we’ve been reading today just seem to be perfectly falling into our lap.  We just blogged about the presence of technology in education and asked if it could indeed be distracting.

Well lo and behold, a study of Facebook just published by Mashable begins with this statement: “In the debate over whether social media has a positive or negative effect on education, a new study to be published in Computers & Education has made a refreshing suggestion: Neither. It depends how you use it.”

The article goes on to say that those who post photos, comment on posts, play games, etc. don’t do as well as those who simply RSVP to Facebook events.  The entire post is an interesting read, and brings up some good points.  Check it out at the link above.