BRINK Book Pick #3 is a real trippy cultural artifact of a book. If this 1978 cover doesn’t compel you to to read the story of "Hawkman’s radio-contolled harem boys," well then I don’t know. 

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THE SIOUX SPACEMAN by Andre Norton 

 ”Kade Whitehawk had two strikes against him in the Space Service. First, he had bungled his assignment on the planet Lodi. Second, he believed all creatures had a right to freedom and dignity—and having such opinions was strictly against the rules. 

But when he was assigned to Klor, he found the Ikkinni there—tortured yet defiant slaves of a vicious tyrant race.

Right then Kade swung at the last pitch. For rules or no rules, THE SIOUX SPACEMAN knew that he had to help these strange creatures gain their freedom … and that he alone, because of his Indian blood, had the key to win it for them.”

Our next scintillating recommendation? Check back and see.

BRINK Book Pick #2 is a sci fi escapade. Don’t be deceived by its brevity, this one packs a punch. 

TIME TO TELEPORT by Gordon R. Dickson

"WORLD WITHOUT WALLS! They called their secret society simply Members of the Human Race, but the majority of humanity preferred to call them "the Inhumans." That’s because it was generally believed that they were a vicious masked gang of vivisectionists, mutators, and monster-makers.

In fact it had got to the point where the world government, that amazing non-national association of services which had abolished war, was about to outlaw and destroy them. If the government acted—and Anthony Sellars its spokesman was ready to—it might be the first armed conflict in a century. But it would be scarcely more than a police action—the entire respectable world against a little hideout bunch of crackpots.

Except, as Sellars was to find out, how do you go about collaring people who can walk through walls?”

Which book will get pulled next? Another reveal is set for tomorrow. 

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Getting serious with our first BRINK book pick…

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MEN AT WAR by Ernest Hemingway 

"In assembling this collection of the greatest war stories of all time, Ernest Hemingway has given us a rare glimpse into history. Presented here are incidents of battle which do not extol wars, but rather the men whose blood and heroism determine their outcomes.

We stand with the valiant Greeks at Thermoplyae, hurl ourselves forward with the French lancers at Austerlitz, bleed with the heroes of the Alamo, and shout our determination at the flame-filled skies over Pearl Harbor. We are side-by-side with men of all nations, as their gallantry burns into history’s pages!”