David Lynch may not love advertising but he loves coffee. He says he drinks seven large cups of his own DAVID LYNCH COFFEE, down from 20 cups of instant. The filmmaker takes another stab at marketing with this "Oh Yeah" commercial for his own line of organic java. It isn’t quite as creepy as the spot he had where he spoke to a disembodied Barbie doll head (complimenting her beauty and selling her on his coffee) last May, but it isn’t nearly as enticing as the ad he did for Gucci by Gucci he did a few years back.

Lynch makes ads but hasn’t had too many nice things to say about marketing. He called product placement “total fucking bullshit.” Later he elaborated, saying he sometimes does advertising to make money, focusing on the “efficiency of saying something and new technologies” but he said “product placement in a film putrefies the environment.”

I guess we won’t be seeing a bag of DAVID LYNCH COFFEE propped up on a shelf in his next film then. 

In an interesting marketing scheme that mixes together aspects of foursquare and Groupon, Jonathan Stark is allowing anyone to access his Starbucks card.  All you need is a smartphone! If there is money on the card, anyone with the picture can scan the card at any Starbucks to pay for their drink.  Stark then encourages the buyer to share their experience, and then add some money to the card for fellow users.  
This could be a fantastic viral campaign for Starbucks — as long as they don’t shut it down, as TechCrunch suggests.

In an interesting marketing scheme that mixes together aspects of foursquare and Groupon, Jonathan Stark is allowing anyone to access his Starbucks card.  All you need is a smartphone! If there is money on the card, anyone with the picture can scan the card at any Starbucks to pay for their drink.  Stark then encourages the buyer to share their experience, and then add some money to the card for fellow users.  

This could be a fantastic viral campaign for Starbucks — as long as they don’t shut it down, as TechCrunch suggests.

According to the Toronto Star, Maxwell House has a new free, pop-up cafe in Toronto for the month of July that uses a campaign of optimism to attract consumers.  The Optimism Cafe urges consumers to take an “optimism break.”  From social media, to television ads, to the cafe itself, the campaign hopes to promote the brand as one that revolves around the idea “that the cup is half full.”  By doing this, it is aiming to gain a following of younger coffee drinkers and attract the droves of Torontonians flocking to the city for the Jazz festival.  The innovative and gutsy marketing strategy seems to be working, but we’ll have to see how it holds up after the cafe closes at the end of July.

According to the Toronto Star, Maxwell House has a new free, pop-up cafe in Toronto for the month of July that uses a campaign of optimism to attract consumers.  The Optimism Cafe urges consumers to take an “optimism break.”  From social media, to television ads, to the cafe itself, the campaign hopes to promote the brand as one that revolves around the idea “that the cup is half full.”  By doing this, it is aiming to gain a following of younger coffee drinkers and attract the droves of Torontonians flocking to the city for the Jazz festival.  The innovative and gutsy marketing strategy seems to be working, but we’ll have to see how it holds up after the cafe closes at the end of July.