Profit from Pride
This weekend I joined in the Capital Pride Parade festivities, albiet only as a spectator. As a first timer, I didn’t really know what to expect other than ostentatious costumes and a party vibe (which I definitely got). What I didn’t expect was how palpable corporate branding would be. It felt more like a parade of walking advertisements than an authentic display of pride and dialogue for equality and acceptance.
Don’t get me wrong, the presence of these brands shouldn’t diminish the message. In fact, it gives me great optimism for the equality movement that support is becoming more pervasive. But as a marketer, I couldn’t help but be intrigued by it all. More brands are “coming out” themselves in order to capitalize on a lucrative market.
My only question would be how many of these companies truly care about the equality movement and how many are just looking at their bottom lines? Or does it even matter? Profit from Pride
This weekend I joined in the Capital Pride Parade festivities, albiet only as a spectator. As a first timer, I didn’t really know what to expect other than ostentatious costumes and a party vibe (which I definitely got). What I didn’t expect was how palpable corporate branding would be. It felt more like a parade of walking advertisements than an authentic display of pride and dialogue for equality and acceptance.
Don’t get me wrong, the presence of these brands shouldn’t diminish the message. In fact, it gives me great optimism for the equality movement that support is becoming more pervasive. But as a marketer, I couldn’t help but be intrigued by it all. More brands are “coming out” themselves in order to capitalize on a lucrative market.
My only question would be how many of these companies truly care about the equality movement and how many are just looking at their bottom lines? Or does it even matter? Profit from Pride
This weekend I joined in the Capital Pride Parade festivities, albiet only as a spectator. As a first timer, I didn’t really know what to expect other than ostentatious costumes and a party vibe (which I definitely got). What I didn’t expect was how palpable corporate branding would be. It felt more like a parade of walking advertisements than an authentic display of pride and dialogue for equality and acceptance.
Don’t get me wrong, the presence of these brands shouldn’t diminish the message. In fact, it gives me great optimism for the equality movement that support is becoming more pervasive. But as a marketer, I couldn’t help but be intrigued by it all. More brands are “coming out” themselves in order to capitalize on a lucrative market.
My only question would be how many of these companies truly care about the equality movement and how many are just looking at their bottom lines? Or does it even matter? Profit from Pride
This weekend I joined in the Capital Pride Parade festivities, albiet only as a spectator. As a first timer, I didn’t really know what to expect other than ostentatious costumes and a party vibe (which I definitely got). What I didn’t expect was how palpable corporate branding would be. It felt more like a parade of walking advertisements than an authentic display of pride and dialogue for equality and acceptance.
Don’t get me wrong, the presence of these brands shouldn’t diminish the message. In fact, it gives me great optimism for the equality movement that support is becoming more pervasive. But as a marketer, I couldn’t help but be intrigued by it all. More brands are “coming out” themselves in order to capitalize on a lucrative market.
My only question would be how many of these companies truly care about the equality movement and how many are just looking at their bottom lines? Or does it even matter? Profit from Pride
This weekend I joined in the Capital Pride Parade festivities, albiet only as a spectator. As a first timer, I didn’t really know what to expect other than ostentatious costumes and a party vibe (which I definitely got). What I didn’t expect was how palpable corporate branding would be. It felt more like a parade of walking advertisements than an authentic display of pride and dialogue for equality and acceptance.
Don’t get me wrong, the presence of these brands shouldn’t diminish the message. In fact, it gives me great optimism for the equality movement that support is becoming more pervasive. But as a marketer, I couldn’t help but be intrigued by it all. More brands are “coming out” themselves in order to capitalize on a lucrative market.
My only question would be how many of these companies truly care about the equality movement and how many are just looking at their bottom lines? Or does it even matter?

Profit from Pride

This weekend I joined in the Capital Pride Parade festivities, albiet only as a spectator. As a first timer, I didn’t really know what to expect other than ostentatious costumes and a party vibe (which I definitely got). What I didn’t expect was how palpable corporate branding would be. It felt more like a parade of walking advertisements than an authentic display of pride and dialogue for equality and acceptance.

Don’t get me wrong, the presence of these brands shouldn’t diminish the message. In fact, it gives me great optimism for the equality movement that support is becoming more pervasive. But as a marketer, I couldn’t help but be intrigued by it all. More brands are “coming out” themselves in order to capitalize on a lucrative market.

My only question would be how many of these companies truly care about the equality movement and how many are just looking at their bottom lines? Or does it even matter?

Heading into the weekend: Some beer branding we can get behind. Ticketybrew has an interesting origin story too, find out more about ‘em.

Facebook Targeting Feature is Live
Today, some of the pages we manage got access to the (possibly game-changing) new targeting possibilities Facebook began rolling out earlier this month. I got to play around with the newfangled posting options a bit today, and from a marketing perspective there are lots of cool possibilities there. In the past, some content we’d like to post just wouldn’t resonant well with or be suited for our total audience, so we skip it. Now that’s no longer a problem. For that reason and others the new feature has been called a “boon” for small businesses, and Brian Carter over at Mashable is even speculating it could help your EdgeRank. 
From a regular old Facebook user perspective, I know I’m interested to see what I will be getting in my personal Facebook News Feed now that I can be targeted based on my gender, relationship status, age, education and interests (in addition to location and language - which were already possible targeting features).
How do you plan to use this new capability for yourself or a brand/band/artist/non-profit who’s profile you manage? Are you nervous that you’ll be bombarded with crap that people think you’d like because you fit certain criteria? 
-Caroline Jackson, Social Media Manager 

Facebook Targeting Feature is Live

Today, some of the pages we manage got access to the (possibly game-changing) new targeting possibilities Facebook began rolling out earlier this month. I got to play around with the newfangled posting options a bit today, and from a marketing perspective there are lots of cool possibilities there. In the past, some content we’d like to post just wouldn’t resonant well with or be suited for our total audience, so we skip it. Now that’s no longer a problem. For that reason and others the new feature has been called a “boon” for small businesses, and Brian Carter over at Mashable is even speculating it could help your EdgeRank

From a regular old Facebook user perspective, I know I’m interested to see what I will be getting in my personal Facebook News Feed now that I can be targeted based on my gender, relationship status, age, education and interests (in addition to location and language - which were already possible targeting features).

How do you plan to use this new capability for yourself or a brand/band/artist/non-profit who’s profile you manage? Are you nervous that you’ll be bombarded with crap that people think you’d like because you fit certain criteria? 

-Caroline Jackson, Social Media Manager