Piggy-backing off of our earlier post about the revolution of the Starbucks’ logo, Webdesigner Depot has put together a list of 5 ways to spruce up a logo.  Of course the article references Starbucks’ recent redesign, along with four other companies who made smart moves with their logos.  Check out the changes here.

Design Envy has put together a brief profile of the Starbucks logo, and how its evolution has shown the strengthening and growth of the brand.
The site states that the removal of the text from the logo shows how large the brand has gotten, as people recognize the logo without the name.  This is especially significant considering the Siren has very little direct connection to the name or product of the company (unlike the apple logo for Apple or the golden arches for McDonalds).
They also brought up the very good point that the cup itself is the greatest brand ambassador.  Starbucks was smart to implement any and all changes to the logo on the cup first, seeing as they are most ubiquitous in our culture.  They describe this entire change as a “textbook example of how to manage a rollout.”  We have to say that we agree.

Design Envy has put together a brief profile of the Starbucks logo, and how its evolution has shown the strengthening and growth of the brand.

The site states that the removal of the text from the logo shows how large the brand has gotten, as people recognize the logo without the name.  This is especially significant considering the Siren has very little direct connection to the name or product of the company (unlike the apple logo for Apple or the golden arches for McDonalds).

They also brought up the very good point that the cup itself is the greatest brand ambassador.  Starbucks was smart to implement any and all changes to the logo on the cup first, seeing as they are most ubiquitous in our culture.  They describe this entire change as a “textbook example of how to manage a rollout.”  We have to say that we agree.

The question still remains: how do you find apps when there are simply so many out there?  We’ve blogged about this before, but more and more solutions seem to keep popping up.

Today, two stories in particular caught our attention.  The first is from Social Times, which claims that Discovr Apps is “one of those apps that you could sit down with and spend time, perhaps too much time, discovering apps that interest you.”  As the picture shows above (taken from the Social Times article), the app works by selecting an app you enjoy, and then creating a kind of web, connecting you with other apps that are similar to the one you already enjoy.

The second story comes from TUAW, who claims that Starbucks will give out free apps in the U.S., using the same format to when they give away free music downloads.  This is clever and could be very effective, as the deal would pique the consumer’s interest in the app itself.  App developers would be smart to look into this, seeing as people are just as addicted to Starbucks as they are to their smartphones.